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If you’re new to contouring, the concept is to lighten the centre of your face… under eyes, bridge of your nose, forehead etc, and then use a slightly darker shade to accentuate or create shadows on you face – hairline, under cheekbones, jawline etc. The result is a more chiseled, angular facial structure.

Here are some tips from the lovely Hailey Middleton to help you achieve a natural look – something you can learn to do day-to-day:

Know your face: Obviously, if you don’t want your nose to look smaller, don’t contour around it. If you have a small forehead, steer clear of making it look even tinier by adding too much shade. Look in the mirror, identify the shadows and let them guide you.

Be subtle: This applies primarily to daytime makeup. We’ve read in some places that you should find a shade 3-4 times darker than your normal skin colour for contouring. That simply terrifies us! To each their own obviously, but I think 1-2 shades darker is a safe bet.

Go easy on your cheeks: We don’t suggest defining the entire cheekbone area… Meaning, add some shade right underneath your cheekbone, but don’t continue the line all the way into your mouth. The result is often too hollowed out, and quite frankly, makes you look older.

Learn to blend: We recommend a beauty blender, but some swear by their foundation brush or fingers. Choose whatever method doesn’t appear streaky or leave lines. Start to blend from the outside of your face and work your way in.

Fill in your brows: We know this doesn’t directly relate to contouring, but having defined brows just completes your facial structure! Your brows play a huge role and shaping your face, so make them stand out! We swear by the Anastasia Brow Powder and Pencil (always aim for the closest shade to your brow colour, or one shade darker).

Was this tutorial helpful? Let us know what you think in the comment section below!

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